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Manly Cemetery has been a special and sacred place for Manly residents since the 1870s. It was consecrated as a burial ground in 1865 and officially became a headstone cemetery in 1872. If you walk through the Cemetery you will find there are some burial sites that pre-date this time. 

Denominations

The cemetery is divided into three sections - Anglican, Catholic and General (other denominations). 

Administration

Trustees were appointed to manage the Cemetery and did so until 1969 when the administration was passed to Manly Council. The Northern Beaches Council took over the management of the cemetery in 2016.

Columbarium

The columbarium is designed in a semi-circle, comprising four walls and two columns. Both sides of the walls are used for niches.  Two stainless steel urns are mounted on the columns, symbolising an eternal flame.

Columbarium Design

The columbarium is designed in a semi-circle, comprising four walls and two columns. Both sides of the walls are used for niches. While a columbarium’s original purpose was to store cremated ashes, the one at Manly is also used as a memorial wall.

Burial Registers

Originally all names for the three denominations were recorded in the handwritten burial registers. These have now been transcribed, sometimes with difficulty. The Roman Catholic and general registers contain more information than the Church of England section.

Cemetery Walk

Members of the Ivanhoe Park Precinct Committee, Council’s Local Studies Librarian, and Terry Metherell of the Manly, Warringah and Pittwater Historical Society compiled a brochure about the cemetery.

The brochure highlights some of the more interesting graves. Take a guided walk through this historic site with the Cemetery Walk and Map.